Breed Group - Terrier

Vulnerable Native Breed - No

Size - Medium

How much exercise? - Up to 1 hour per day

Length of coat - Medium

How much grooming? - Weekly brush & stripping approx twice a year

Supposedly sheds? * - Coat loosens at full length

Town or Country - Either

Type of home - Small House or larger

Minimum Garden Size - Secure Small/Medium

Lifespan - Over 12 Years

* If you are asthmatic or have an allergy, you should consult your medical advisor before considering obtaining a dog. 

Current Registration Colours

When searching for any puppy of a pedigree breed it is very important that you read the Breed Standard so that you are aware of the ideal picture of the breed.

The following colours are currently used for registration but some of them may not appear in the Breed Standard. If you think you might be interested in showing your puppy, or you wish to maintain the colours which are considered by serious breed enthusiasts and the Kennel Club to be the correct ones, view the Breed Standard.


Red Wheaten



Wheaten Red

Colour Not Recognised By KC

Colour Not Recognised in the list above indicates that a colour is not correct as regards the Breed Standard for the breed. The Breed Standard describes the desired colours in the breed, and while other colours may exist, these are considered undesirable in this breed. Undesirable colours may have occurred due to out crossing, or should be avoided if they are known to indicate conditions which can be detrimental to health. It should be noted however that where a colour is known to be detrimental to health the Kennel Club will refuse registration.



You may be aware that some breeds of dog and their crosses can be susceptible to inherited disease. Of course you want to be sure that the dog you choose is as healthy as possible, and you would like to know that it has not inherited any undesirable disease-causing genes from its parents. There is some help in that DNA tests for diseases in purebred dogs are available for some conditions in some breeds, but there are not very many such tests just yet! There are also, however, a number of clinical veterinary screening schemes that dog breeders can use to increase the probability of producing healthy puppies.

Details of the various screening schemes, both veterinary and DNA, that are available to breeders in the UK can be found at

Potential dog owners should be aware that, at present, the application of various health screening results to breeding programmes is not always straightforward, and breeders may make choices for various reasons. A responsible breeder though, will always be willing to discuss relevant health issues with you. Breed clubs are often useful sources of breed-specific information.

Schemes or advice relevant to this breed

There are not currently any veterinary screening schemes or DNA tests for disease relevant to this breed under the Assured Breeder Scheme, however you should still ask breeders and refer to breed clubs about health issues in the breed.

The following health tests are available.


DNA test - HFH

The list above is not necessarily comprehensive, other available health tests can be found at 

or for further advice please contact your local breed club.


Irish Terrier - Category 2

Particular points of concern for individual breeds may include features not specifically highlighted in the breed standard including current issues. In some breeds, features may be listed which, if exaggerated, might potentially affect the breed in the future.

Prior to 2014 the features listed below derived from a combination of health surveys, veterinary advice, a meeting of Kennel Club Group judges, feedback from judges at shows or consultation with individual breed club(s)/councils via the breed health coordinators.

From 2014 the structure of Breed Watch allows for a greater involvement by judges in the reporting on

Points of concern for special attention by judges

· Cracked and corny pads